Web Mobile Design

WordPress, Dreamweaver, Photoshop, PHP, HTML, CSS

Web Compliant, Browser Friendly for Safari, Modzilla, Explorer. HTML, Script, CSS, Meta Code Tags, Key words. WordPress, Dreamweaver, Photoshop, Google XML sitemap, site verification coding and Google-bot meta script call outs for Robot Spider Bots. Meta Key wording Tags, Hierarchy and Zombie Bot Maker Coding. Images Optimized for Maximum Load Speeds.

Web design encompasses many different skills and disciplines in the production and maintenance of websites.

The different areas of web design include web graphic design; interface design; authoring, including standardised code and proprietary software; user experience design; and search engine optimization. Often many individuals will work in teams covering different aspects of the design process, although some designers will cover them all.[1] The term web design is normally used to describe the design process relating to the front-end (client side) design of a website including writing mark up. Web design partially overlaps web engineering in the broader scope of web development. Web designers are expected to have an awareness of usability and if their role involves creating mark up then they are also expected to be up to date with web accessibility guidelines.

The mobile Web refers to browser-based Internet services accessed from handheld mobile devices, such as smartphones or feature phones, through a mobile or other wireless network.

Traditionally, the World Wide Web has been accessed via fixed-line services on laptops and desktop computers. However, the Web is now more accessible by portable and wireless devices. An early 2010 ITU (International Telecommunication Union) report said that with current growth rates, web access by people on the go — via laptops and smart mobile devices — is likely to exceed web access from desktop computers within the next five years.  In January 2014 mobile Internet use exceeded desktop use in the United States. The shift to mobile Web access has accelerated since 2007 with the rise of larger multitouch smartphones, and since 2010 with the rise of multitouch tablet computers. Both platforms provide better Internet access, screens, and mobile browsers, or application-based user Web experiences, than previous generations of mobile devices. Web designers may work separately on such pages, or pages may be automatically converted, as in Mobile Wikipedia. Faster speeds, smaller, feature-rich devices, and a multitude of applications continue to drive explosive growth for mobile Internet traffic. The 2017 Virtual Network Index (VNI) report produced by Cisco Systems forecasts that by 2021, there will be 5.5 billion global mobile users (up from 4.9 billion in 2016).  Additionally, the same 2017 VNI report forecasts that average access speeds will increase by roughly 3 times from 6.8 Mbit/s to 20 Mbit/s in that same time span with video comprising the bulk of the traffic (78%).

The distinction between mobile Web applications and native applications is anticipated to become increasingly blurred, as mobile browsers gain direct access to the hardware of mobile devices (including accelerometers and GPS chips), and the speed and abilities of browser-based applications improve. Persistent storage and access to sophisticated user interface graphics functions may further reduce the need for the development of platform-specific native applications.

Standards improve the interoperability, usability, and accessibility of mobile web usage.

The Mobile Web Initiative (MWI) was set up by the W3C to develop the best practices and technologies relevant to the mobile Web. The goal of the initiative is to make browsing the Web from mobile devices more reliable and accessible. The main aim is to evolve standards of data formats from Internet providers that are tailored to the specifications of particular mobile devices. The W3C has published guidelines for mobile content, and is addressing the problem of device diversity by establishing a technology to support a repository of device descriptions.

W3C is also developing a validating scheme to assess the readiness of content for the mobile web, through its mobileOK Scheme, which will help content developers to quickly determine if their content is web-ready. The W3C guidelines and mobile OK approach have not been immune from criticism.[citation needed] This puts the emphasis on Adaptation, which is now seen as the key process in achieving the ubiquitous web, when combined with a device description repository.

mTLD, the registry for .mobi, has released a free testing tool called the MobiReady Report (see mobiForge) to analyze the mobile readiness of website. It does a free page analysis and gives a Mobi Ready score. This report tests the mobile-readiness of the site using industry best practices and standards.

Other standards for the mobile web are being documented and explored for particular applications by interested industry groups, such as the use of the mobile web for the purpose of education and training.

Mobile first, unobtrusive JavaScript, and progressive enhancement

“Mobile first”, unobtrusive JavaScript, and progressive enhancement are related concepts that predate RWD. Browsers of basic mobile phones do not understand JavaScript or media queries, so a recommended practice is to create a basic web site and enhance it for smart phones and PCs, rather than rely on graceful degradation to make a complex, image-heavy site work on mobile phones.
Progressive enhancement based on browser, device, or feature detection

Where a web site must support basic mobile devices that lack JavaScript, browser (“user agent”) detection (also called “browser sniffing”) and mobile device detection are two ways of deducing if certain HTML and CSS features are supported (as a basis for progressive enhancement)—however, these methods are not completely reliable unless used in conjunction with a device capabilities database.

For more capable mobile phones and PCs, JavaScript frameworks like Modernizr, jQuery, and jQuery Mobile that can directly test browser support for HTML/CSS features (or identify the device or user agent) are popular. Polyfills can be used to add support for features—e.g. to support media queries (required for RWD), and enhance HTML5 support, on Internet Explorer. Feature detection also might not be completely reliable; some may report that a feature is available, when it is either missing or so poorly implemented that it is effectively nonfunctional.

 

Recent Web / Mobile Sites. Click on images to view

               

 

                http://convoysmog.com/

 

 

Search Engine Top Placement, Local Business Maps Expert, Google Adwords Certified

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  • Facebook.com / Twitter / Youtube.com – Video and Posts
  • Craigslist / Others – Setup, Images, Videos, Links to Web Site and Others
  • Domain Name Submittals to Major Search Engines Like Google, Yahoo, Bing
  • Domain Name Multi Purchase, Online Real Estate, Redirects
  • Photoshop, Dreamweaver, Xhtml, CSS, Script, FTP, Printing, Multi Media Support

 

SEO – Search Engine Optimization

SEM – Search Engine Marketing

Websites, Mobile Design and Development

WordPress, Dreamweaver, Photoshop

HTML, CSS, PHP

Search Engine Top Placement and Social Media Advertising Support

Google Adwords and Business Local Maps Optimization

Graphic Design: Photoshop and Illustrator

Brochures, catalogs, fliers, postcards Large format print design Vehicle wrap vinyl print design Trade show booth graphic design Color management

 

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